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Creative Articulation Practice at Home:
Fun for the Whole Family!
by Keri Spielvogle, MCD, CCC-SLP
Looking for a new way to work on articulation skills at home? Or a new and different way to get your students interested in articulation therapy? Make it fun and exciting for your children by trying the following suggestion. It’s an activity for all the children to enjoy!
Fun Articulation Practice..."in a box!"
  1. Make a "mystery box" using common household objects and your child’s toys. Cut a slot in the top of a good-sized box. Make sure that your child’s hands plus an object fit through the slot.
  2. Help your child decorate the box the way he/she wants it to look. This makes the child feel like he/she is participating and provides a great language-building activity.
  3. Talk to your child’s SLP about what he/she is working on in therapy.
  4. Some specific questions to ask are:
    1. What sound/sounds is he/she working on in speech class?
    2. What position/positions is he/she working on with each sound? (Basically, initial means a sound at the beginning;medial means a sound in the middle; and final means a sound at the end. For example, for the /k/sound,"cup" is initial;"bacon" is medial; and "book" is final.)
    3. What level is he/she working on? (There are different levels a child works on, each getting more difficult. The "easiest" level is isolation , or the "k" sound alone. Next, the "k" sound is in some position within a syllable (i.e. ,"ka," "aka," or "ak.") Next, the word level (i.e., cup, bacon, book), then, a phrase (i.e., "in the cup;" "in the book"), then, a sentence (i.e., "I read a book," or "The juice is in the cup"). Finally, the sound is monitored in conversation for consistent production.)
  5. Pick 10-15 objects, letter cards, or syllable cards with your child’s target sound in them and, without your child seeing,"hide" them in the Mystery Box.
  6. Let your child choose an object/card and say/name it, use it in a phrase, sentence, or ask questions to elicit conversation.
  7. Continue until your child sees all objects and completes each task.
  8. For a special treat, put a "surprise" in the box your child can keep or eat!
Some ideas for five commonly misarticulated sounds are:
SInitialMedialFinal
 cereal
celery
cent
seed
seashell
salt
soap
soup
softball
sock
bicycle (toy)
dinosaur (toy)
motorcycle (toy)
pencil
receipt
baseball
glasses
icing
bracelet
whistle
bus (toy)
dress
(shoe) lace
box (smaller)
horse (toy)
(dental) floss
lace
purse
ice (in a baggie)
necklace
SH shoe
shapes (toy)
ship (toy)
shirt
shells
shampoo
shoelace
sugar
shovel (toy)
shark (toy)
horseshoe
toothbrushes
tissue
marshmallows
nutshells
washcloth
dishes (toy)
invitation
lotion
flashlight
hairbrush
toothbrush
fish (toy/picture)
mouthwash
nail polish
dish
leash
paintbrush
starfish
licorice
R rope
rose
ring
rabbit (toy)
robe
rattle
ribbon
radio
rocket (toy)
raisins
airplane (toy)
carrots
earrings
horse (toy)
purse
fork
marbles
markers
shirt
fire engine (toy)
(teddy) bear
car (toy)
pear
jar
flower
feather
dollar
dinosaur (toy)
paper
letter
K can
key
car (toy)
comb
candy
kite
carrots
cow (toy)
cat (toy)
corn
chicken (toy)
bacon (toy)
pumpkin (toy)
rocket (toy)
helicopter (toy)
bicycle (toy)
sneaker
napkin
chocolate
monkey (toy)
sock
stick
truck (toy)
block
snake (toy)
book
cake
rake (toy)
milk
black (crayon)
L lamp (toy)
leaf
lamb (toy)
lime
ladder (toy)
lemon
letter
lipstick
lotion
lizard (toy)
balloon
collar
dollar
jelly
necklace
pillow
ruler
elephant (toy)
marshmallows
helicopter (toy)
bell
doll
ball
bowl
nail
football
pencil
towel
seashell
mail
Use this activity with all your children and with every sound. With a little creativity, you can make articulation practice FUN!
 
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